Fiction

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The Bobbsey Twins

Christian Gellert's Last Christmas

by Berthold Auerbach

A Christmas short-story extracted from "German Tales".

Blood of the Gods

Nan Sherwood's Winter Holidays

by Annie Roe Carr

Excerpt: Ta-ra! ta-ra! ta-ra-ra-ra! ta-rat! Professor Krenner took the silver bugle from his lips while the strain echoed flatly from the opposite, wooded hill. That hill was the Isle of Hope, a small island...

The People of the Pit

The Land of the Hibiscus Blossom

The Country of The Knife

Alarm Clock

by Everett B. Cole

Most useful high explosives, like ammonium nitrate, are enormously violent ... once they're triggered. But they will remain seemingly inert when beaten, burned, variously punished--until the particular shock...

The Real Hard Sell

by William W. Stuart

Naturally human work was more creative, more inspiring, more important than robot drudgery. Naturally it was the most important task in all the world … or was it?

The Birth of Athena

Strange Alliance

by Bryce Walton

Haunted by their dark heritage, a medieval fate awaited them....

Th Blindman's World

The Metropolis

by Upton Sinclair

Deals with New York as unsparingly as "The Jungle" dealt with Chicago.

The Bobbsey Twins at Home

Lease to Doomsday

by Lee Archer

The twins were a rare team indeed. They wanted to build a printing plant on a garbage dump. When Muldoon asked them why, their answer was entirely logical: ''Because we live here.''

The Flirt

Harry Heathcote of Gangoil

The Bobbsey Twins on a Houseboat

The Jupiter Weapon

by Charles Louis Fontenay

He was a living weapon of destruction—immeasurably powerful, utterly invulnerable. There was only one question: Was he human?

Castle Richmond