Shaman

Editorial reviews

Shaman

Shaman is set in an era of human history almost unimaginably different from ours, but Robinson brings it alive through a detailed account of Loon's experiences.

It’s an investment, and in the end it’s a worthwhile investment: a trip into the past and some of the early stages of human society, filled with imagination and creativity. An anthropological treat, to be sure!

Publishers Weekly : Shaman (September 03, 2013)

Fans of the author’s smooth prose and intense research will find enough of both, but the book is far outclassed by both Robinson’s earlier works and other prehistory novels.

Though rather more modest in its scope and conventional in its concepts than Kim Stanley Robinson’s staggering space operas, Shaman tells an ambitious, absorbing and satisfyingly self-contained tale on its own terms.

Robinson keeps stylization of the language to a minimum, without stooping too low, so that the story itself can break free of the page and linger in the mind — which worked for me.