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Citizen Canine: Our Evolving Relationship with Cats and Dogs

In his often fetching but highly uneven new book, “Citizen Canine,” David Grimm, a deputy news editor at Science magazine, points to such developments as evidence that the social status of dogs and cats has been rapidly evolving.


The Intern's Handbook: A Thriller

Make sure you don’t miss The Intern’s Handbook by Shane Kuhn, as far as debuts go, this one hits the bullseye.


Casebook: A novel

For a few delicious days, Simpson allows readers to relish the innocence of childhood and the intense yearning to discover the secrets of life. That part, at least, never ends.


Resurrection

Add a narrator whose rapid-fire monologue piles additional layers of digression atop Brenner’s own circumlocutions, and you have the shaggiest detective currently working the field.


The Land of Steady Habits: A Novel

Thompson’s sharp-eyed debut is that kind of searing portrait of American wealth unraveling that is both dazzling and immeasurably sad.


Not Without You

A Star Is Born meets All About Eve, Evans’ (Happily Ever After, 2012, etc.) latest deftly weaves together tales of old and new Hollywood, allowing star-crossed romance, mystery and danger to collide in surprising and often devastating ways.


Far Gone

Not bad, but not memorable in any way.


Brooklyn Girls

Brooklyn Girls is a fresh take on the lives of new adults and has everything you could want in a book – drama, romance, friendship and humor.


Savage Girl

This is a novel that will stay with you even after you finish reading it.


Spin

Spin is a super fun read. While the idea of alcoholism and rehab is quite serious, McKenzie handles her subject very well, keeping the book light and entertaining while never belittling the actual issue. It's a nice balance that works quite well.


Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt

Thanks in part to Lewis’ storytelling, a system hidden away in black boxes in heavily guarded buildings in New Jersey and Chicago has been dragged into the light.


A Farm Dies Once a Year

A Farm Dies Once a Year is about more than vegetables or farming. It is about fathers and sons, childhood and trauma, roots and ambitions. It is about self-discovery and self-fulfillment — those elusive goals that may be permanently beyond our reach.


Empress of the Night

Stachniak’s account of the event mirrors the historical account perfectly, and provides a perfect moment of historical fiction where the characters truly come to life for the reader.


Still Life with Bread Crumbs: A Novel

Still Life with Bread Crumbs is a gem of universal truths.


I Can Hear You Whisper: An Intimate Journey through the Science of Sound and Language

All parents will recognize the moments of both terror and pride that mark the journey; parents of deaf children will garner both information and insights.


Aunt Dimity and the Wishing Well

Lori’s latest is perfect for those who prefer charmingly low-key puzzles to blood-soaked chills and thrills.


Chop Chop: A Novel
Kirkus Reviews : Chop Chop (April 17, 2014)

For British readers, David Nicholls meets Guy Ritchie; for Americans, Dave Eggers channels Anthony Bourdain.


A Private Venus: A Duca Lamberti Noir

Scerbanenco was not Italy's first great crime novelist. That honor goes to the Sicilian Leonardo Sciascia, who is, frankly, a much greater writer. But Scerbanenco was a trailblazing radical who pulled the mask off a whole era.


Updike

Not only has Begley written a convincing interpretative biography, one characterized by suavity, wit and independent judgment throughout, he has also produced a major work of Updike criticism.