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Biography & autobiography

The Yellow House

Out of the materials of memory and archival history, Broom's memoir solidly reconstructs what the forces of nature and institutionalized racism succeeded in knocking down.


Unspeakable

Shawcross can certainly write – there are some lovely images in Unspeakable – and she is obviously in possession of a curious and interesting mind. But there is simply not enough for a book here – or not for this book, in this form.


Salt On Your Tongue

A hybrid of nature journal and motherhood memoir sounds cynically on-trend, but Salt never feels anything less than wholly authentic.


A Rebel in Gaza

The world would be poorer without Ghoul’s voice, without her warmth, her fury and her laughter.


All You Can Ever Know

Compassion-filled, truthful and page-turningly compelling, ALL YOU CAN EVER KNOW is dexterous, honest work. Exquisite and inquisitive, it gets at the heart of what it means to belong.


Rise

The book is a lot like its author – unapologetic, businesslike and impatient to make a difference.


Heart Berries

Mailhot alludes at one point to her desire and her felt duty as a Native writer to convey the humanity of her people and subvert stereotypes. She has succeeded by telling the ugly truth with rich and beautiful words, sumptuous imagery and an unforgettable speech. This is a startling book.


Old In Art School

Painter’s story begins with the revelation that, “Being seen as an old woman added a new way of seeing myself as reflected in the eyes of others.” But as she drills down on art-making she develops the skill — the artistic mastery — to hold the gaze herself. A great gift of age, and art.


Patient Care

Whether describing the obstinacy of patients, the brave faces worn by worried relatives, the technical aspects of repairing injured bodies, or the elation of helping potential catastrophes end well, Paul Seward fills his attractively written narrative with authoritative detail, strong emotion, and a precise sense of place.


Making Oscar Wilde

Mendelssohn’s research is prodigious; she has tapped sources previously unavailable to other scholars.


Mean

Mean should be read alongside canonical nonfiction novels such as Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior. Far from overexposed, autofiction may have only just recently found its stride: unsettling normative storytelling by creating a space for a multitude of voices and histories