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Starling Days

Complex and resonant.


Untold Night and Day

To read this novel of shrouded pilgrimages is also to arrive at a meaning that is “bewitching, and utterly private, a secret for me, a single ship, a single concealed place”.


The Devil’s Due
Kirkus Reviews : The Devil's Due (November 01, 2019)

Loose-limbed, prodigiously inventive, plotted with infernal logic, and riotously implausible from beginning to end.


The Yellow House

Out of the materials of memory and archival history, Broom's memoir solidly reconstructs what the forces of nature and institutionalized racism succeeded in knocking down.


Triangulum

Magnificently disorienting and meticulously constructed, Triangulum couples an urgent subtext with an unceasing sense of mystery. This is a thought-provoking dream of a novel, situated within thought-provoking contexts both fictional and historical.


The Refugees

In The Refugees Nguyen contributes to America’s narrative plentitude by adding to our collective story lives we must see if we’re ever to satisfy those ghosts.


Unspeakable

Shawcross can certainly write – there are some lovely images in Unspeakable – and she is obviously in possession of a curious and interesting mind. But there is simply not enough for a book here – or not for this book, in this form.


Sea Monsters
The Modern Novel : Sea Monsters (January 14, 2019)

It is all about a young woman trying to find who she is and where she is going and what life holds for her.


The Little Snake

What The Little Snake is about more than anything, though, is the acceptance of death as an ineluctable part of life. It’s not a new message, but Kennedy conveys it here in a manner that is subtle and hugely moving.


Salt On Your Tongue

A hybrid of nature journal and motherhood memoir sounds cynically on-trend, but Salt never feels anything less than wholly authentic.


Ghost Trees

In Ghost Trees Gilbert rails gently against global warming and globalisation, and laments the decline of natural diversity and the loss of community that, he says, comes with it.


The Little Snake

In “The Little Snake,” the swift emotional slippages click along, one after another, sentence after sentence, like an intricate concatenation of rainbow-bright dominoes.


A Rebel in Gaza

The world would be poorer without Ghoul’s voice, without her warmth, her fury and her laughter.


Future Politics

It is mind-boggling enough just to contemplate the vastness of the challenge. To have written it all down so lucidly, engagingly and succinctly is a formidable achievement.


Slip of a Fish

The work is original, ambitious and challenging, submerging the reader in the strangeness of an anomalous mind, an aqueous medium where language is refracted into mazes of shifting meanings.


The Hazards of Good Fortune

Overall, a smart, sharp-eyed, entertaining, engrossing story.


Black Prince

The Black Prince is anything but a grim read. It’s a stylistic pastiche that is far more than a tribute act – as though Roberts has dismantled the clockwork that made Burgess tick and reassembled it in a new form.


The Penalty Area

The Penalty Area is charming, and it’s easy to imagine it being a film. If you need a bookish boost, you can’t go wrong with this story.


The Flight of the Maidens

Gardam’s ability to bring people so fully to life, in such vivid detail, never fails to delight. Such vivid people and dialogue — more than many of her books, I could imagine this as a film.