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Allegiant

Ultimately, Allegiant is a book that has its many flaws and missteps, but it’s an ambitious book that goes for all the marbles.


Stella Bain

Stella Bain is a relatively simple novel that attempts to tackle too many weighty topics, of which shell shock and its physical manifestations are just one example.


Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened

If you’re like me and you’re familiar with Allie’s story, pick up this book for a walk down memory lane and discover some of her new and hilarious stories.
If you’re unfamiliar with Allie Brosh’s story, start with this book and then head over to her hilarious website for more laugh out loud moments.


Red Sky in Morning

For all its thriller components this is an intensely literary novel, depending on atmosphere and evocation for its effect.


Steelheart

Despite all I did like about Steelheart, the blah-ness I walked away with came clearly from David’s narration and I don’t know if this is a series I’ll choose to continue.


Fortune's Pawn

Fortune’s Pawn was a very entertaining read; it ticked off nearly all the mental check boxes I set up when I open up a space-based science fiction novel.


A Dance of Cloaks

By the end, it’s an engrossing read that will leave the reader wanting to read the next one very soon.


The Minor Adjustment Beauty Salon

A little slower-moving and more diffuse than many of the 13 preceding volumes in this celebrated series (The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection, 2012, etc.), but it’s no more than you’d expect from a heroine whose fleetness has never been as big a draw as her wisdom.


The All-Girl Filling Station's Last Reunion: A Novel

Flagg flies high, and her fans will enjoy the ride.


Champion
Kirkus Reviews : Champion (November 05, 2013)

Ever respectful of the capacity of its readers, this series offers a satisfying conclusion of potential rather than a neatly wrapped denouement.


The Golden City
Kirkus Reviews : The Golden City (November 05, 2013)

A diverting read, with plenty of loose ends for a sequel.


The Frackers: The Outrageous Inside Story of the New Billionaire Wildcatters
Kirkus Reviews : The Frackers (November 05, 2013)

A fascinating study of American entrepreneurial culture and the modern robber barons who succeeded in creating an energy revolution.


Drawn Into Darkness

Springer (Dark Lie, 2012, etc.) has a flair for setting and characterization but not for integrating different plotlines and viewpoints. The result is a muddle of mawkishness, arch humor and gross details that drags on at least 50 pages too long.


The Whispering of Bones

Rock (A Plague of Lies, 2012, etc.) has painstakingly recreated 17th-century Paris, although with a decidedly modern emphasis on guilt as a prime motivator. A strong, sympathetic protagonist, however, atones for both the author’s lapses and his own in this latest case file of an aspiring priest.


The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism
Kirkus Reviews : The Bully Pulpit (November 05, 2013)

It’s no small achievement to have something new to say on Teddy Roosevelt’s presidency, but Goodwin succeeds admirably. A notable, psychologically charged study in leadership.


Someone

McDermott is an extraordinary writer. This is a beautiful book.


My Notorious Life: A Novel

Excellent biographical historical fiction!


The House of Journalists

You sense that this is simply not the great novel you were expecting, but you still feel confident that Finch is capable of writing one. And when he does, you will be eager to read it.


Double Down: Game Change 2012

They succeed in taking readers interested in the backstabbing and backstage maneuvering of the 2012 campaign behind the curtains, providing a tactile, if sometimes “fast and hammy,” sense of what it looked like from the inside.


Jeeves and the Wedding Bells

If, on the scale of enjoyment, reading Jeeves and the Wedding Bells is not The Revolt of Islam, it’s not, as Faulks himself would acknowledge, Wodehouse either.