Editorial reviews

Recently Added

Sort

Recently Added

Publication Date

 

Range

All Time

This Month

This Week

 

Categories

All

Literary

Mystery & Detective

Thrillers

Fantasy

Science Fiction

Biography & autobiography

After I'm Gone

She does feed us crumbs along the way but there is always plenty left to be revealed as the story progresses.


I See You Made an Effort: Compliments, Indignities, and Survival Stories from the Edge of 50

Gurwitch riffs hilariously on such matters as aging out of your wardrobe and heading into "the Eileen Fisher years" draped in "[s]waths of material gently cascading over the area where your waistline once was."


Annihilation

“Annihilation” is successfully creepy, an old-style gothic horror novel set in a not-too-distant future. The best bits turn your mind inside out.


MFA vs NYC

“MFA vs NYC” will appeal to many young writers, not merely for its insider perspective but also for its gossip and confessional essays.


The Amazing Harvey

The Amazing Harvey is a strong mystery with a truly compelling hero, who I hope to see more from. I’d love to see what Harvey could get up to once he finally makes it to Vegas….


A Killing of Angels

The Scottish bear of a man from the Met shows his more vulnerable side, something that’s so often lacking in the overly masculine detectives of the genre, on either side of the pond.


Bark: Stories

Seesawing with uncanny adeptness between facetiousness and earnestness, she keeps readers slightly off balance as she works her way through moving portraits of vulnerability, awkwardness, resignation and melancholic fortitude.


Mad as Hell

“Mad as Hell” is most engrossing when the focus is on how the work actually got done: how the screenwriter wrote and cut and rewrote; how the director shot and planned the next shot; how the casting was completed; and how the producer, director and screenwriter accommodated their fancy constellation of stars.


A Highly Unlikely Scenario, or a Neetsa Pizza Employee's Guide to Saving the World: A Novel

The promise of wonder found in Cantor’s novel is the promise of fiction itself—that by picking up a book you will be a spirited away into another world, one full of banality and extravagance, of Neetsa Pizza and Neo-Maosim, which is what makes idle browsing at a bookstore or library so pleasurable.


Division Street

Many of the best poems in Division Street are full of art but bereft of ego, not just because Mort has more important subjects to dwell on, but also because writing is a waiting game and authorship is always deferred.


My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag . . . and Other Things You Can't Ask Martha

Kerr has a way of handling these questions with such forcefully breezy aplomb that hidden within each answer, there is a greater piece of advice: Don't be intimidated by having to solve embarrassing problems, because they happen to everyone. You can manage.


Wake: A Novel

This novel remembers a time of difficulty and examines it in a new, refreshing way.


The Secret Life of Bees

While I really enjoyed The Secret Life of Bees, on closer consideration it’s very much a flawed novel, but still one worth reading if one takes its flaws into account.


Bark: Stories

Though the best of the stories leave a delightful aftertaste, there’s often not enough to chew on. Still, it’s better to be left wanting more.


Prayers for the Stolen

Clement has written their story in a world of her own making, and in doing so she has realized a level of empathy that is absent in the news stories and bloody headlines that mark these otherwise forgotten tragedies.


Romance Is My Day Job: A Memoir of Finding Love at Last

Ultimately, Patience’s heroism lies in her extraordinary optimism about the male sex despite the abundance of evidence she encounters to the contrary.


My Name Is Resolute

Nancy E. Turner is a master storyteller who steeps this page-turning saga in well-researched history of the 18th century.


The Adventures of Henry Thoreau: A Young Man's Unlikely Path to Walden Pond

From this refreshing re-examination of a national icon, we learn that Henry David Thoreau was a non-conformist, a bit 'on the spectrum' as we might deduce through today’s lens, but not quite the utter hermit some have supposed him to be.


Runner
Bookreporter : Runner (February 21, 2014)

I spent most of the novel waiting for a net to drop over Dryden and Rachel. It does, for a moment or two, but Lee is just getting started. By book’s end, your heart will be in your mouth or on the floor, everywhere it’s not supposed to be.