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Never Laugh as a Hearse Goes By

An entertaining read for anyone who loves a 'body in the library' style mystery. It is lightly-drawn, well-plotted and has plenty to keep the reader interested.


The Wolves of Midwinter

Despite a few gorgeous Morphenkinder of sinister intent, “The Wolves of Midwinter” disturbingly identifies goodness with beauty.


Sense & Sensibility

So my verdict is – as Mags Dashwood would say – "Totes Amazeballs".


The Valley of Amazement

Just as Violet is a complex character beyond her Asian and white ethnic roots, Tan’s large-hearted, florid and ragged tale goes beyond casual stereotypes.


Sense & Sensibility

The Austen Project is a breathtaking tribute to Jane Austen. Profit-driven 21st-century publishers have faith in her iconic name and immaculate plots. I can’t wait to read the other five “updates” while being reminded to reread, joyfully, the originals.


The Goldfinch: A Novel

The reader is swept into an aria of sorts about a lost childhood and a lost mother and a lost painting. "The Goldfinch" sings, page after page.


Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

This lyrical and meditative book ranks familiarly as history or biography, but is more than either.


Levels of Life

It is as intimate a book as Barnes has ever written, but its beauty — and art — comes from elegant restraint.


Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington

This well-researched biography is sure to appeal to longtime jazz fans who revel in their memories of Ellington’s work and others who may want to learn more about his fascinating life.


Critical Mass: Four Decades of Essays, Reviews, Hand Grenades, and Hurrahs

These essays make a sustained and surprising case for Mr. Wolcott as a soulful cultural sentry.


Someone

Rejoice, because there’s a new novel by Alice McDermott, called Someone, and it’s very very good.


The Luminaries

There are readers who will be fascinated by the structure and ambiguities of “The Luminaries.” But by and large, it’s a critic’s nightmare.


The Abominable: A Novel

The Abominable is a frustrating novel for its multiple misdirections and contradictions, and the dense nature of what is ultimately a thriller novel undermines much of the potential tension inherit in such a novel.


Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy

In the end, it almost seems that she, inadvertently, is the one who has really been killed off.


Dying Is My Business

Dying Is My Business is a solid entry in Nicholas Kaufmann’s new urban fantasy detective series. Wherever he takes the next books, I’ll be there, front and center.


Roth Unbound

Roth Unbound brings heightened understanding to the extraordinary scope and risk-taking brilliance of Roth's work, and makes a compelling case for its enduring importance.


The Goldfinch: A Novel

Tartt has created a rare treasure: a long novel that never feels long, a book worthy of our winter hibernation by the fire.


Eminent Hipsters

He presents it with such style and humour, you’re almost willing him back on the tour bus, if only to get another volume like this out of him.


The Signature of All Things: A Novel

This is a novel blooming off the shelves ready to be picked!


Reality Boy

Her stories and her characters are written with a level of compassion, with a level of sympathy that make her stories beautiful, fierce, and significant. I just can’t get over how good Reality Boy is.