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Mark of the Beast

Thriller fans comfortable with mixing science and the book of Revelations might enjoy this one, but others will have a devil of a time liking it.


Migratory Animals

A finely wrought if somewhat melancholy first novel.


Whipping Boy
Kirkus Reviews : Whipping Boy (January 20, 2015)

Full of intrigue and suspense, the story follows the bizarre twists and turns of one man’s journey to find and confront his childhood tormentor—ready-made for a film treatment.


The Globe: The Science of Discworld II: A Novel
Kirkus Reviews : The Globe (January 20, 2015)

It's baffling why this appealingly distinctive offshoot (there are two volumes still to come) of the wildly popular Discworld yarns took so long to cross the Atlantic.


Cane and Abe
Kirkus Reviews : Cane and Abe (January 20, 2015)

If only the answers to these questions were as good as the questions. As it is, Grippando supplies a satisfyingly wild ride through Presumed Innocent territory before the inevitable letdown.


Polaris

Arnett continues to create a fascinating galaxy for her characters to inhabit and the space adventures continue to excite.


My Father's Wives

Much dribbling punctuated by a few slam dunks.


The Rabbit Back Literature Society

Has some Twin Peaks moments even if it tries a little too hard. Still, read with all the lights on!


The Same Sky: A Novel

Earnest and well-told. Heartstrings will be pulled.


The Accidental Countess

Worthy of a novelette, perhaps, or a novella if you try hard, but when nothing stands between the characters except stupidity, misunderstandings, lack of communication, and general jiggery-pokery, you’re not going to have a novel that reads well.


The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Kirkus Reviews : The Evil Hours (January 20, 2015)

An eye-opening investigation of war’s casualties.


Baltimore Blues

As a series kick off, it works perfectly. Tess is engaging and stands out - an athletic and inquisitive woman who's more than a bit judgmental but incredibly clever.


The Rabbit Back Literature Society

It’s one of those rare books that trusts its readers far more than it should, allowing them to piece together clues and suggestions without providing easy answers.


Ships, Clocks, and Stars

Whether called by a love of seamanship and navigation, an attraction to science and technology, or an appreciation of 18th- and 19th-century history, a wide range of readers is sure to enjoy this beautiful book.


Uncle Janice: A Novel
Bookreporter : Uncle Janice (January 17, 2015)

Uncle Janice is more of a character study than a work of crime fiction, but has enough elements of both to attract readers willing to cross genre borders.


The Undertaker's Daughter

Mayfield finds her stride in this evocative return to the 1960s, to a society that dared not speak of disease, disability or difference to a South not yet liberated from racism, despite the public face of integration and to a home dominated by dead bodies.


Amnesia: A novel

It was still a jarring departure which left me wishing for more of the sucker's tale told so well at the start.


The Winter War

He may not have the consistency and sophistication of Franzen, but The Winter War remains an intelligent debut.


Selected Letters of Norman Mailer

Anyone familiar with the personal essays will know where Mailer siphoned that energy. With their unguarded directness, the letters allow us access to his naked thought, unshrouded by his often byzantine prose.