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The Cartel: A novel

“The Cartel” culminates in a near-symphonic array of lethal coups de grace, written with such hallucinatory intensity that the whole book seems to have turned into a synchronized fireworks display.


In the Country: Stories

Clearly a writer with enchanting powers, Alvar wills us to crisscross the globe with them all over again.


England and Other Stories

Had such entries been left on the cutting room floor, “England” would have been a pensive, virtuosic collection. As it stands, it’s a lovely tapestry of stories with some unfortunate unraveled threads.


Anger Is an Energy

There’s plenty of good stuff, particularly the chapters in which Lydon conjures his hardscrabble youth.


Lord Fear: A Memoir

A nonlinear, scrapbook-style investigative memoir as redolent of the bluesy crime pursuits of Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe as it is of the narcotized reveries of William Burroughs.


The Goddess Pose: The Audacious Life of Indra Devi, the Woman Who Helped Bring Yoga to the West

“The Goddess Pose” builds to a thrilling conclusion, exposing the power struggles and sex scandals within Sai Baba’s inner circle, a tale reminiscent of recent bad behavior by other male gurus.


The Wright Brothers: Wright Brothers

“The Wright Brothers” will do more than help Americans tell Orville from Wilbur.


You Look Like That Girl: A Child Actor Stops Pretending and Finally Grows Up

When fans know the tales of child actors are all too often rife with turbulence, reading the memoir of the girl who avoided it all just isn’t worth the time.


Paradise Sky

I like metafictional criticism in my Westerns, but even if you don’t belong to that incredibly specific demographic, Paradise Sky still has enough guns, glory and goofiness to keep you entertained.


Lanterne Rouge: The Last Man in the Tour de France

“Being lanterne rouge is about so many other things than being last it is barely about being last at all,” writes Leonard. “It’s about…doing what you can do to the best of your abilities and not giving up.” Indeed, it’s nice to know that there is a place in history for those whose great achievement is seeing it through to the end.


Shakespeare and the Countess: The Battle that Gave Birth to the Globe

Intrepid research translates into a sometimes-intriguing narrative stuffed with mystifying detail.


In a French Kitchen: Tales and Traditions of Everyday Home Cooking in France

A tempting and helpful guide to delectable food.


The End of Plenty: The Race to Feed a Crowded World

The insertion of notes at the end of each chapter rather than at the back of the book gives it a textbook feel, which may put off some readers. It should not: this call to arms is lucid, informative, and even entertaining, fully deserving a wide readership.


In Search of Sir Thomas Browne: The Life and Afterlife of the Seventeenth Century's Most Inquiring Mind

An elegant, pleasantly obsessive study of a “life of tolerance, humour, serenity and untiring curiosity.”


The Nightmare Place: A Novel

Despite some awkward plot contrivances and secondary characters who are little better than outlines, Mosby (The Murder Code, 2013, etc.) has the talent to build both physical and psychological suspense. And he proves once again that he really knows how to work the strings.


The Convictions of John Delahunt: A Novel

A Kafkaesque study of an amoral weakling consumed by an unrestrained bureaucracy.


Humankind: How Biology and Geography Shape Human Diversity
Kirkus Reviews : Humankind (June 15, 2015)

Homogenization is inevitable, but we are an extraordinarily varied species today, and Harcourt delivers an opinionated but always science-based account of how we got that way.


Bitter Bronx: Thirteen Stories

A little creepy but juggling too many narrative (and horror-movie) threads.


Day Four: A Novel
Kirkus Reviews : Day Four (June 16, 2015)

A little creepy but juggling too many narrative (and horror-movie) threads.