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Zapotec Deviance: The Convergence of Folk and Modern Sociology

by Henry A. Selby

Henry Selby's ethnographic study of the Zapotec Indians of a small community in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, reveals that the notion of the social basis of deviance is implicit in Zapotec thinking. Zapotecs...


The Big Ratchet: How Humanity Thrives in the Face of Natural Crisis

by Ruth DeFries

A MacArthur “Genius” and eminent scientist shows how an ordinary mammal manipulated nature to become a technologically sophisticated city-dweller—and why our history points to an optimistic future in the...


Insignia of Rank in the Nahua World: From the Fifteenth to the Seventeenth Century

by Justvna Olko

In this significant work, Olko reconstructs the repertory of insignia of rank and the contexts and symbolic meanings of their use, along with their original terminology, among the Nahuatl-speaking communities...


I Cover the Waterfront: Stories from the San Diego Shore

by Max Miller

“Distinctive, original, fresh in in tone and manner, with a quaint whimsicality of feeling and expression.”—The New York Times

Life on the Western waterfront has always fascinated Max Miller, a special reporter...


In Amazonia: A Natural History

by Hugh Raffles

The Amazon is not what it seems. As Hugh Raffles shows us in this captivating and innovative book, the world's last great wilderness has been transformed again and again by human activity. In Amazonia brings...


System and Succession: The Social Bases of Political Elite Recruitment

by John B. Nagle

System and Succession provides a comparative analysis of the social composition of national political leadership in the United States, Russia, Germany, and Mexico. These systems were chosen as case studies because...


The Virgin's Children: Life in an Aztec Village Today

by William Madsen

An absorbing account of the descendants of the ancient Aztecs and of the survival of their culture into the twentieth century in the Valley of Mexico is presented in this fascinating volume. Focusing on San...


The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier, and Smarter

by Susan Pinker

In her surprising, entertaining, and persuasive new book, award-winning author and psychologist Susan Pinker shows how face-to-face contact is crucial for learning, happiness, resilience, and longevity.

 

From...


Mosquito Trails: Ecology, Health, and the Politics of Entanglement

by Alex M. Nading

Dengue fever is the world's most prevalent mosquito-borne illness, but Alex Nading argues that people in dengue-endemic communities do not always view humans and mosquitoes as mortal enemies. Drawing on two...


Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refugees

by Yen Le Espiritu

Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es) examines how the Vietnam War has continued to serve as a stage for the shoring up of American imperialist adventure and for the (re)production of American...


Unfinished Conversations: Mayas and Foreigners Between Two Wars

by Paul Sullivan

A century ago, European and North American archaeologists first came upon the extraordinary ruins of Chichen Itza and Tulum—and started to converse with the Mayas who inhabited the forests of the Yucatan....


Blind Spot: How Neoliberalism Infiltrated Global Health

by Salmaan, M.D. Keshavjee

Neoliberalism has been the defining paradigm in global health since the latter part of the twentieth century. What started as an untested and unproven theory that the creation of unfettered markets would give...


Paradise Transplanted: Migration and the Making of California Gardens

by Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo

Gardens are immobile, literally rooted in the earth, but they are also shaped by migration and by the transnational movement of ideas, practices, plants, and seeds. In Paradise Transplanted, Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo...


Knowing Their Place: The Intellectual Life of Women in the 19th Century

by Professor Brendan Walsh

Knowing Their Place is a comprehensive account of the public, private and intellectual life of Irish women in the Victorian age. In particular, this book looks at the steady progress of girls and women within...


Cultural Renewal: Restoring the Liberal and Fine Arts

by Arthur Pontynen

The decline of interest in the liberal and fine arts is widely lamented. At issue is why this decline happened and how we might restore qualitative standards by which to live. Arthur Pontynen establishes that...


Working Skin: Making Leather, Making a Multicultural Japan

by Joseph D. Hankins

Since the 1980s, arguments for a multicultural Japan have gained considerable currency against an entrenched myth of national homogeneity. Working Skin enters this conversation with an ethnography of Japan's...


Anthropology of Nature

by Liz Libbrecht

It looks as though the anthropology of nature is an oxymoron of sorts, given that for the past few centuries, nature has been characterized in the West by humans’ absence, and humans, by their capacity to...


Conflicts About Class: Debating Inequality in Late Industrialism

by David J. Lee & Bryan S. Turner

In recent years there has been growing debate among sociologists about the concept of class and its relevance to the highly industrialised world of the late twentieth century. This book makes available in a...


Egalitarian Revolution in the Savanna: The Origins of a West African Political System

by Stephen A. Dueppen

Many West African societies have egalitarian political systems, with non-centralised distributions of power. 'Egalitarian Revolution in the Savanna' analyses a wide range of archaeological data to explore the...


Under the Rainbow: Nature and Supernature Among the Panare Indians

by Jean-Paul Dumont

This ethnographic study of the Panare Indians of Venezuela is the first extensive look at a tribe of this region of the Amazonia. It is an important book not only because it delves into the myth-filled Panare...