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So Far from Allah, So Close to Mexico: Middle Eastern Immigrants in Modern Mexico

by Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp

Middle Eastern immigration to Mexico is one of the intriguing, untold stories in the history of both regions. In So Far from Allah, So Close to Mexico, Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp presents the fascinating findings...


The Prisoners of Perote

by William Preston Stapp & Joe B. Frantz

In late 1842, Private William Preston Stapp and about three hundred other citizens of the Republic of Texas took it upon themselves to invade Mexico. They intended to retaliate for a recent Mexican attack on...


Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America

by Daniel Arreola

Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States-but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans...


Nationalist Voices in Jordan: The Street and the State

by Betty S. Anderson

According to conventional wisdom, the national identity of the Jordanian state was defined by the ruling Hashemite family, which has governed the country since the 1920s. But this view overlooks the significant...


The Port of Houston: A History

by Marilyn Mcadams Sibley

Sam Houston's army reached Buffalo Bayou on April 18, 1836, and the ensuing Battle of San Jacinto called attention to the "meandering stream" as a link between the interior of sprawling Texas and the sea. Early...


Creole Economics: Caribbean Cunning under the French Flag

by Katherine E. Browne

What do the trickster Rabbit, slave descendants, off-the-books economies, and French citizens have to do with each other? Plenty, says Katherine Browne in her anthropological investigation of the informal economy...


The Concubine, the Princess, and the Teacher: Voices from the Ottoman Harem

by Douglas Scott Brookes

In the Western imagination, the Middle Eastern harem was a place of sex, debauchery, slavery, miscegenation, power, riches, and sheer abandon. But for the women and children who actually inhabited this realm...


The Maya and Teotihuacan: Reinterpreting Early Classic Interaction

by Geoffrey E. Braswell

Since the 1930s, archaeologists have uncovered startling evidence of interaction between the Early Classic Maya and the great empire of Teotihuacan in Central Mexico. Yet the exact nature of the relationship...


Sex, Death, and Sacrifice in Moche Religion and Visual Culture

by Steve Bourget

The Moche people who inhabited the north coast of Peru between approximately 100 and 800 AD were perhaps the first ancient Andean society to attain state-level social complexity. Although they had no written...


A Hanging in Nacogdoches: Murder, Race, Politics, and Polemics in Texas's Oldest Town, 1870-1916

by Gary B. Borders

On October 17, 1902, in Nacogdoches, Texas, a black man named James Buchanan was tried without representation, condemned, and executed for the murder of a white family-all in the course of three hours. Two white...


Cañar: A Year in the Highlands of Ecuador

by Judy Blankenship

Once isolated from the modern world in the heights of the Andean mountains, the indigenous communities of Ecuador now send migrants to New York City as readily as they celebrate festivals whose roots reach back...


The Politics of Sentiment: Imagining and Remembering Guayaquil

by O. Hugo Benavides

Between 1890 and 1930, the port city of Guayaquil, Ecuador, experienced a liberal revolution and a worker's movement-key elements in shaping the Ecuadorian national identity. In this book, O. Hugo Benavides...


Making Ecuadorian Histories: Four Centuries of Defining Power

by O. Hugo Benavides

In Ecuador, as in all countries, archaeology and history play fundamental roles in defining national identity. Connecting with the prehistoric and historic pasts gives the modern state legitimacy and power....


On the Dirty Plate Trail: Remembering the Dust Bowl Refugee Camps

by Sanora Babb, Douglas Wixson & Dorothy Babb

The 1930s exodus of "Okies" dispossessed by repeated droughts and failed crop prices was a relatively brief interlude in the history of migrant agricultural labor. Yet it attracted wide attention through the...


Reading Palestine: Printing and Literacy, 1900-1948

by Ami Ayalon

Prior to the twentieth century, Arab society in Palestine was predominantly illiterate, with most social and political activities conducted through oral communication. There were no printing presses, no book...


The Laws of Slavery in Texas: Historical Documents and Essays

by Randolph B. Campbell, William S. Pugsley & Marilyn P. Duncan

The laws that governed the institution of slavery in early Texas were enacted over a fifty-year period in which Texas moved through incarnations as a Spanish colony, a Mexican state, an independent republic,...


Imagining Identity in New Spain: Race, Lineage, and the Colonial Body in Portraiture and Casta Paintings

by Magali M. Carrera

Reacting to the rising numbers of mixed-blood (Spanish-Indian-Black African) people in its New Spain colony, the eighteenth-century Bourbon government of Spain attempted to categorize and control its colonial...


Reframing Latin America: A Cultural Theory Reading of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

by Erik Ching, Christina Buckley & Angélica Lozano-Alonso

Providing an extensive introduction to cultural studies in general, regardless of chronological or geographic focus, and presenting provocative, essential readings from Latin American writers of the last two...


Moctezuma's Children: Aztec Royalty under Spanish Rule, 1520-1700

by Donald E. Chipman

Though the Aztec Empire fell to Spain in 1521, three principal heirs of the last emperor, Moctezuma II, survived the conquest and were later acknowledged by the Spanish victors as reyes naturales (natural kings...


Spanish Texas, 1519-1821: Revised Edition

by Donald E. Chipman & Harriett Denise Joseph

Modern Texas, like Mexico, traces its beginning to sixteenth-century encounters between Europeans and Indians who contested control over a vast land. Unlike Mexico, however, Texas eventually received the stamp...