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Frontier Taiwan: An Anthology of Modern Chinese Poetry

by Michelle Yeh & N. G. D. Malmqvist

Taiwan has evolved dramatically from a little-known island to an internationally acclaimed economic miracle and thriving democracy. The history of modern Taiwanese poetry parallels and tells the story of this...


Who Ate Up All the Shinga?: An Autobiographical Novel

by Yu Young-nan & Stephen Epstein

Park Wan-suh is a best-selling and award-winning writer whose work has been widely translated and published throughout the world. Who Ate Up All the Shinga? is an extraordinary account of her experiences growing...


Fitzgerald and Hemingway: Works and Days

by Scott Donaldson

F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway might have been contemporaries, but our understanding of their work often rests on simple differences. Hemingway wrestled with war, fraternity, and the violence of nature....


When the Future Disappears: The Modernist Imagination in Late Colonial Korea

by Janet Poole

Taking a panoramic view of Korea’s dynamic literary production in the final decade of Japanese rule, When the Future Disappears locates the imprint of a new temporal sense in Korean modernism: the impression...


Visions of Dystopia in China's New Historical Novels

by Jeffrey C. Kinkley

The depiction of personal and collective suffering in modern Chinese novels differs significantly from standard Communist accounts and most Eastern and Western historical narratives. Writers such as Yu Hua,...


The Kojiki: An Account of Ancient Matters

by Gustav Heldt

Written in the early eighth century, the Kojiki is considered Japan’s first literary and historical work. A compilation of myths, legends, songs, and genealogies, it recounts the birth of Japan’s islands,...


Death of a Discipline

by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

For almost three decades, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak has been ignoring the standardized "rules" of the academy and trespassing across disciplinary boundaries. Today she remains one of the foremost figures in...


The Columbia Sourcebook of Literary Taiwan

by Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang, Michelle Yeh & Ming-ju Fan

This sourcebook contains more than 160 documents and writings that reflect the development of Taiwanese literature from the early modern period to the twenty-first century. Selections include seminal essays...


The Elements of Academic Style: Writing for the Humanities

by Eric Hayot

Eric Hayot teaches graduate students and faculty in literary and cultural studies how to think and write like a professional scholar. From granular concerns, such as sentence structure and grammar, to big-picture...


Edwin Arlington Robinson: A Poet's Life

by Scott Donaldson

At the time of his death in 1935, Edwin Arlington Robinson was regarded as the leading American poet-the equal of Frost and Stevens. In this biography, Scott Donaldson tells the intriguing story of this poet's...


Chinese Fiction of the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries: Essays by Patrick Hanan

C. T. Hsia on Chinese Literature

by C. T. Hsia

-- Choloe Starr, The China Quarterly


Classic Writings on Poetry

by William Harmon

The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty. He is a sovereign, and stands on the centre.—Ralph Waldo Emerson, from "The Poet"

"[The poet] is a seer . . . . he is individual . . . he is complete...


Just Living: Poems and Prose of the Japanese Monk Tonna

by Steven D. Carter

One of the best scholar-translators in the field presents a selection of writings by Tonna (1289--1372), an outstanding medieval Buddhist poet-monk, very little of whose work has been translated until now. Tonna...


The Resurrected Skeleton: From Zhuangzi to Lu Xun

by Wilt L. Idema

The Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi (369–286 B.C.E.) encountered a skull that later in a dream praises the pleasures of death over the toil of living. This anecdote became popular with poets in the second and...


The Sarashina Diary: A Woman's Life in Eleventh-Century Japan

by Takasue no Musume Sugawara no, Sonja Arntzen & Moriyuki Ito

A thousand years ago, a young Japanese girl embarked on a journey from the wild East Country to the capital. She began a diary that she would continue to write for the next forty years and compile later in life,...


Ecosickness in Contemporary U.S. Fiction: Environment and Affect

by Heather Houser

The 1970s brought a new understanding of the biological and intellectual impact of environmental crises on human beings, and as efforts to prevent ecological and human degradation aligned, a new literature of...


Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery

by Nabil Matar

During the early modern period, hundreds of Turks and Moors traded in English and Welsh ports, dazzled English society with exotic cuisine and Arabian horses, and worked small jobs in London, while the "Barbary...


Prose of the World: Modernism and the Banality of Empire

by Saikat Majumdar

Everyday life in the far outposts of empire can be static, empty of the excitement of progress. A pervading sense of banality and boredom are, therefore, common elements of the daily experience for people living...


The Weave of My Life: A Dalit Woman's Memoirs

by Urmila Pawar, Maya Pandit & Wandana Sonalkar

"My mother used to weave aaydans, the Marathi generic term for all things made from bamboo. I find that her act of weaving and my act of writing are organically linked. The weave is similar. It is the weave...