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Charles Darwin: The Power of Place

National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography/Autobiography 2002

by Janet Browne

In 1858 Charles Darwin was forty-nine years old, a gentleman scientist living quietly at Down House in the Kent countryside, respected by fellow biologists and well liked among his wide and distinguished circle...


Darwin's Sacred Cause: How a Hatred of Slavery Shaped Darwin's Views on Human Evolution

by Adrian Desmond & James Moore

In this remarkable book, Adrian Desmond and James Moore restore the missing moral core of Darwin’s evolutionary universe, providing a completely new account of how he came to his shattering theories about...


Jane Goodall: The Woman Who Redefined Man

by Dale Peterson

This essential biography of one of the most influential women of the past century shows how truly remarkable Jane Goodall’s accomplishments have been. Goodall was a secretarial school graduate when Louis Leakey,...


Me Father was the Keeper: John Smeaton and the Eddystone Light

by Anonymous

Me Father was the keeper of the Eddystone light, He married a mermaid one fine night... The Eddystone Rocks are among the most feared and romanticized rock formations in the world. Guarding the approaches to...


Dorothy Hodgkin

by Georgina Ferry

Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994) was renowned for her medically-important work on penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin. Fully engaged with the political and social currents of her time, she participated in some of...


Bringing Nothing To The Party: True Confessions Of A New Media Whore

by Paul Carr

A fascinating and hilarious expose of how a group of young opportunists, chancers and geniuses found instant fame and fortune by messing about on the web. And one man's attempt to follow in their footsteps.

Having...


Einstein

by Ronald Clark

First published in 1972, Ronald W. Clark's definitive biography of Einstein, the Promethean figure of our age, goes behind the phenomenal intellect to reveal the human side of the legendary absent-minded professor....


J.B.S

by Ronald Clark

J. B. S. Haldane (1892-1964) was one of the most brilliant of British scientists - and one of the most controversial. A trail-blazing geneticist and physiologist, who used himself as his own guinea-pig, he was...


John Napier: Life, Logarithms, and Legacy

by Julian Havil

John Napier (1550–1617) is celebrated today as the man who invented logarithms—an enormous intellectual achievement that would soon lead to the development of their mechanical equivalent in the slide rule:...


The Site: A Personal Odyssey

by Robert W. Nero

Poetry or potsherds? This dilemma is confronted by one of Canada's top nature writers in this account of a lifetimes involvement as an avocational archaeologist.


Sir Sandford Fleming: His Early Diaries, 1845-1853

by Jean Murray Cole

Best known for his major railway-building accomplishments, Sir Sandford Fleming's origins are revealed in these early diaries that record his thoughts as an 18-year-old leaving his family home in Scotland for...


William C. Van Horne: Railway Titan

by Valerie Knowles

Born in Illinois in 1843, William C. Van Horne was lured to Canada in 1881 to become the general manager of the fledgling Canadian Pacific Railway. He went on to become the company president. He was a man of...


Michael Faraday

by Walter Jerrold

"Tyndall, I must remain plain Michael Faraday to the last." In these words, with which he replied to Professor Tyndall's urgent appeal to him to accept the Presidency of the Royal Society, we have a key-note...


The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

by Walter Isaacson

Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, Walter Isaacson’s New York Times bestselling and critically acclaimed The Innovators is a “riveting, propulsive, and at times deeply moving” (The Atlantic...


The Self-Made Anthropologist: A life of A. P. Elkin

by Tigger Wise

This is an account of the remarkable life of Australia's first professor of anthropology, whose national and international reputation as a champion of the Aboriginal people is now the subject of considerable...


Dog Days, Raven Nights

by John M. Marzluff & Colleen Marzluff

Twenty years ago, fresh out of graduate school and recently married, John and Colleen Marzluff left Arizona for a small cabin in the mountains of western Maine. Their mission: to conduct the first-ever extensive...


G. Evelyn Hutchinson and the Invention of Modern Ecology

by Nancy G. Slack & Edward O. Wilson

Stephen J. Gould declared G. Evelyn Hutchinson the most important ecologist of the twentieth century. E. O. Wilson pronounced him ";one of the few scientists who could unabashedly be called a genius."; In this...


Time, Love , Memory: A Great Biologist and His Quest for the Origins of Behavior

National Book Critics Circle Award for General Non-fiction 1999

by Jonathan Weiner

"A fascinating history--. Literate and authoritative--.Marvelously exciting." --The New York Times Book Review

Jonathan Weiner, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Beak of the Finch, brings his brilliant reporting...


Rocket Man: Robert H. Goddard and the Birth of the Space Age

by David A. Clary

More famous in his day than Einstein or Edison, the troubled, solitary genius Robert H. Goddard (1882-1945) was the American father of rocketry and space flight, launching the world's first liquid-fuel rockets...


The Curies: A Biography of the Most Controversial Family in Science

by Denis Brian

Focusing on the lives and relationships behind their magnificent careers, The Curies is the first biography to trace the entire Curie dynasty, from Pierre and Marie's fruitful union and achievements to the lives...