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Structures in the Stream: Water, Science, and the Rise of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

by Todd Shallat

As the Mississippi and other midwestern rivers inundated town after town during the summer of 1993, concerned and angry citizens questioned whether the very technologies and structures intended to "tame" the...


Landmarks of Texas Architecture

by Lawrence W. Speck & Richard Payne

"This selection of twenty of Texas' proudest architectural achievements is a tiny sampling of the state's rich, but little-heralded, architectural heritage. The visual presentation of these buildings in Richard...


San Juan Bautista: Gateway to Spanish Texas

by Robert S. Weddle

In their efforts to assert dominion over vast reaches of the (now U.S.) Southwest in the seventeenth century, the Spanish built a series of far-flung missions and presidios at strategic locations. One of the...


Montana Ghost Dance: Essays on Land and Life

by John B. Wright

Montana has been the "last best place" for so many people. A century ago, Native Americans gathered here to perform the Ghost Dance—a last, doomed attempt to make white settlers vanish and bring back the old...


Tejano Journey, 1770-1850

by Gerald E. Poyo

A century before the arrival of Stephen F. Austin's colonists, Spanish settlers from Mexico were putting down roots in Texas. From San Antonio de Bexar and La Bahia (Goliad) northeastward to Los Adaes and later...


Las Tejanas: 300 Years of History

by Teresa Palomo Acosta & Ruthe Winegarten

Since the early 1700s, women of Spanish/Mexican origin or descent have played a central, if often unacknowledged, role in Texas history. Tejanas have been community builders, political and religious leaders,...


The Quiet Revolutionaries: Seeking Justice in Guatemala

by Frank M. Afflitto & Paul Jesilow

The last three decades of the twentieth century brought relentless waves of death squads, political kidnappings, and other traumas to the people of Guatemala. Many people fled the country to escape the violence....


Memory, Oblivion, and Jewish Culture in Latin America

by Marjorie Agosin

Latin America has been a refuge for Jews fleeing persecution from 1492, when Sepharad Jews were expelled from Spain, until well into the twentieth century, when European Jews sought sanctuary there from the...


Long Dark Road: Bill King and Murder in Jasper, Texas

by Ricardo C. Ainslie

On a long dark road in deep East Texas, James Byrd Jr. was dragged to his death behind a pickup truck one summer night in 1998. The brutal modern-day lynching stunned people across America and left everyone...


So Far from Allah, So Close to Mexico: Middle Eastern Immigrants in Modern Mexico

by Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp

Middle Eastern immigration to Mexico is one of the intriguing, untold stories in the history of both regions. In So Far from Allah, So Close to Mexico, Theresa Alfaro-Velcamp presents the fascinating findings...


The Prisoners of Perote

by William Preston Stapp & Joe B. Frantz

In late 1842, Private William Preston Stapp and about three hundred other citizens of the Republic of Texas took it upon themselves to invade Mexico. They intended to retaliate for a recent Mexican attack on...


Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America

by Daniel Arreola

Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States-but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans...


Nationalist Voices in Jordan: The Street and the State

by Betty S. Anderson

According to conventional wisdom, the national identity of the Jordanian state was defined by the ruling Hashemite family, which has governed the country since the 1920s. But this view overlooks the significant...


The Port of Houston: A History

by Marilyn Mcadams Sibley

Sam Houston's army reached Buffalo Bayou on April 18, 1836, and the ensuing Battle of San Jacinto called attention to the "meandering stream" as a link between the interior of sprawling Texas and the sea. Early...


Creole Economics: Caribbean Cunning under the French Flag

by Katherine E. Browne

What do the trickster Rabbit, slave descendants, off-the-books economies, and French citizens have to do with each other? Plenty, says Katherine Browne in her anthropological investigation of the informal economy...


The Concubine, the Princess, and the Teacher: Voices from the Ottoman Harem

by Douglas Scott Brookes

In the Western imagination, the Middle Eastern harem was a place of sex, debauchery, slavery, miscegenation, power, riches, and sheer abandon. But for the women and children who actually inhabited this realm...


The Maya and Teotihuacan: Reinterpreting Early Classic Interaction

by Geoffrey E. Braswell

Since the 1930s, archaeologists have uncovered startling evidence of interaction between the Early Classic Maya and the great empire of Teotihuacan in Central Mexico. Yet the exact nature of the relationship...


Sex, Death, and Sacrifice in Moche Religion and Visual Culture

by Steve Bourget

The Moche people who inhabited the north coast of Peru between approximately 100 and 800 AD were perhaps the first ancient Andean society to attain state-level social complexity. Although they had no written...


A Hanging in Nacogdoches: Murder, Race, Politics, and Polemics in Texas's Oldest Town, 1870-1916

by Gary B. Borders

On October 17, 1902, in Nacogdoches, Texas, a black man named James Buchanan was tried without representation, condemned, and executed for the murder of a white family-all in the course of three hours. Two white...


Cañar: A Year in the Highlands of Ecuador

by Judy Blankenship

Once isolated from the modern world in the heights of the Andean mountains, the indigenous communities of Ecuador now send migrants to New York City as readily as they celebrate festivals whose roots reach back...