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Outsider in the Promised Land: An Iraqi Jew in Israel

by Nissim Rejwan

In 1951, Israel was a young nation surrounded by hostile neighbors. Its tenuous grip on nationhood was made slipperier still by internal tensions among the various communities that had immigrated to the new...


The Last Jews in Baghdad: Remembering a Lost Homeland

by Nissim Rejwan & Joel Beinin

Once upon a time, Baghdad was home to a flourishing Jewish community. More than a third of the city's people were Jews, and Jewish customs and holidays helped set the pattern of Baghdad's cultural and commercial...


The Great Syrian Revolt and the Rise of Arab Nationalism

by Michael Provence

The Great Syrian Revolt of 1925 was the largest and longest-lasting anti-colonial insurgency in the inter-war Arab East. Mobilizing peasants, workers, and army veterans, rather than urban elites and nationalist...


Israeli Culture Between the Two Intifadas: A Brief Romance

by Yaron Peleg

Over the past two decades, profound changes in Israel opened its society to powerful outside forces and the dominance of global capitalism. As a result, the centrality of Zionism as an organizing ideology waned,...


A Tribal Order: Politics and Law in the Mountains of Yemen

by Shelagh Weir

A Tribal Order describes the politico-legal system of Jabal Razih, a remote massif in northern Yemen inhabited by farmers and traders. Contrary to the popular image of Middle Eastern tribes as warlike, lawless,...


Muslim Reformers in Iran and Turkey: The Paradox of Moderation

by Günes Murat Tezcür

Moderation theory describes the process through which radical political actors develop commitments to electoral competition, political pluralism, human rights, and rule of law and come to prefer negotiation,...


Western Window in the Arab World

by Leon Borden Blair

Since November 8, 1942, when American troops in Operation Torch first landed on the beaches of North Africa, almost a million Americans-military personnel and their dependents-have lived in Morocco. Their impact...


The Emergence of Kurdish Nationalism and the Sheikh Said Rebellion, 1880-1925

by Robert Olson & William F. Tucker

The last quarter of the nineteenth century was crucial for the development of Kurdish nationalism. It coincided with the reign of Abdulhamid II (1876-1909), who emphasized Pan-Islamic policies in order to strengthen...


Palestinian Lawyers and Israeli Rule: Law and Disorder in the West Bank

by George Emile Bisharat

As frequent intermediaries between Israeli military authorities and Palestinian citizens, Palestinian lawyers stand close to the fault line dividing Israeli and Palestinian societies. The conflicts and tensions...


Essays in Ottoman and Turkish History, 1774-1923: The Impact of the West

by Roderic H. Davison

The effect of Western influence on the later Ottoman Empire and on the development of the modern Turkish nation-state links these twelve essays by a prominent American scholar. Roderic Davison draws from his...


The Book of Dede Korkut: A Turkish Epic

by Faruk Sümer, Ahmet E. Uysal & Warren S. Walker

One of the oldest surviving pieces of Turkish literature, The Book of Dede Korkut can be traced to tenth-century origins. Now considered the national epic of Turkey, it is the heritage of the ancient Oghuz Turks...


Preparing the Mothers of Tomorrow: Education and Islam in Mandate Palestine

by Ela Greenberg

From the late nineteenth century onward, men and women throughout the Middle East discussed, debated, and negotiated the roles of young girls and women in producing modern nations. In Palestine, girls' education...


Israeli and Palestinian Postcards: Presentations of National Self

by Tim Jon Semmerling

Searing images of suicide bombings and retaliatory strikes now define the Israeli-Palestinian conflict for many Westerners, but television and print media are not the only visual realms in which the conflict...


Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq

by Magnus T. Bernhardsson

The looting of the Iraqi National Museum in April of 2003 provoked a world outcry at the loss of artifacts regarded as part of humanity's shared cultural patrimony. But though the losses were unprecedented in...


Imagining the Turkish House: Collective Visions of Home

by Carel Bertram

"Houses can become poetic expressions of longing for a lost past, voices of a lived present, and dreams of an ideal future." Carel Bertram discovered this truth when she went to Turkey in the 1990s and began...


"This Is Jerusalem Calling": State Radio in Mandate Palestine

by Andrea L. Stanton

Modeled after the BBC, the Palestine Broadcasting Service was launched in 1936 to serve as the national radio station of Mandate Palestine, playing a pivotal role in shaping the culture of the emerging middle...


The Berber Identity Movement and the Challenge to North African States

by Bruce Maddy-Weitzman

Like many indigenous groups that have endured centuries of subordination, the Berber/Amazigh peoples of North Africa are demanding linguistic and cultural recognition and the redressing of injustices. Indeed,...


How Happy to Call Oneself a Turk: Provincial Newspapers and the Negotiation of a Muslim National Identity

by Gavin D. Brockett

The modern nation-state of Turkey was established in 1923, but when and how did its citizens begin to identify themselves as Turks? Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Turkey's founding president, is almost universally...


Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine

by Laura Robson

Drawing on a rich base of British archival materials, Arabic periodicals, and secondary sources, Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine brings to light the ways in which the British colonial state...


Witches, Whores, and Sorcerers: The Concept of Evil in Early Iran

by Satnam Mendoza Forrest & Prods Oktor Skjaervø

Early Iranians believed evil had to have a source outside of God, which led to the concept of an entity as powerful and utterly evil as God is potent and good. These two forces, good and evil, which have always...