James Shapiro

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A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare

Samuel Johnson Prize 2006

by James Shapiro

1599 was an epochal year for Shakespeare and England

Shakespeare wrote four of his most famous plays: Henry the Fifth, Julius Caesar, As You Like It, and, most remarkably, Hamlet; Elizabethans sent off an army...


The Year of Lear: Shakespeare in 1606

by James Shapiro

Preeminent Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro shows how the tumultuous events in England in 1606 affected Shakespeare and shaped the three great tragedies he wrote that year—King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony and...


Oberammergau: The Troubling Story of the World's Most Famous Passion Play

by James Shapiro

The Bavarian village of Oberammergau has staged the trial, crucifixion, and resurrection of Christ nearly every decade since 1634. Each production of the Passion Play attracts hundreds of thousands, many drawn...


Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare?

by James Shapiro

For more than two hundred years after William Shakespeare's death, no one doubted that he had written his plays. Since then, however, dozens of candidates have been proposed for the authorship of what is generally...


Contested Will

by James Shapiro

For more than two hundred years after William Shakespeare's death, no one doubted that he had written his plays. Since then, however, dozens of candidates have been proposed for the authorship of what is generally...


Who Wrote Shakespeare?: The Case for William Shakespeare of Stratford

by James Shapiro

This ebook is an excerpt from Contested Will by James Shapiro, and originally appeared as the last section titled "Shakespeare."  In this chapter, Shapiro succintly and eloquently makes the case for why no...