Scientific American

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Understanding Autism

by Scientific American Editors

The term “autism” first appeared in the early 1900s and comes from the Greek word “autos,” meaning self, used to describe conditions of social withdrawal – or the isolated self. Today, autism is one...


Cyber Hacking

by Scientific American Editors

Cyberspace has certainly transformed the world. From media and communications to banking, an increasing number of daily activities is performed online. We are living digital lifestyles. While this transformation...


The Science of Sports: Winning in the Olympics

by Scientific American & Scientific American Editors

The Olympics are the world's most prestigious stage for athletic competition. Fans both casual and hardcore tune in religiously every few years to watch as men and women push themselves to the limits of human...


Ask the Experts: Physics and Math

by Scientific American Editors

For going on two decades, Scientific American’s “Ask the Experts” column has been answering reader questions on all fields of science. We’ve taken your questions from the basic to the esoteric and reached...


Allergies, Asthma and the Common Cold

by Scientific American Editors

During allergy season, sufferers know the drill: runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing up a storm. For the unlucky with asthma, symptoms might also include coughing and wheezing. However, asthma is not always caused...


Allergies, Asthma and the Common Cold

by Scientific American Editors

During allergy season, sufferers know the drill: runny nose, watery eyes, sneezing up a storm. For the unlucky with asthma, symptoms might also include coughing and wheezing. However, asthma is not always caused...


Tomorrow's Medicine

by Scientific American Editors

One hundred years ago, most of the medical treatments and technologies that we take for granted hadn’t even been imagined or were found in the pages of science fiction novels rather than medical journals....


Designing the Urban Future

by Scientific American Editors

We expect a lot from our technology. More and more products are created not only to perform multiple complex functions, but also to react to stimuli, patterns and information in a way that solves problems. Cars...


Designing the Urban Future

by Scientific American Editors

We expect a lot from our technology. More and more products are created not only to perform multiple complex functions, but also to react to stimuli, patterns and information in a way that solves problems. Cars...


Doing the Right Thing

by Scientific American Editors

Most of us have probably had those discussions, either in a classroom setting or otherwise, where a hypothetical situation is given and you’re asked to choose between two or more unsatisfying options. If you...


Doing the Right Thing

by Scientific American Editors

Most of us have probably had those discussions, either in a classroom setting or otherwise, where a hypothetical situation is given and you’re asked to choose between two or more unsatisfying options. If you...


The Secrets of Consciousness

by Scientific American Editors

Consciousness is an enigmatic beast. It’s more than mere awareness – it’s how we experience the world, how our subjective experience relates to the objective universe around us. And therein lies the rub,...


From Abuse to Recovery

by Scientific American Editors

Addiction is costly on many levels to the individuals affected, their families and society as a whole, but science may soon be able to offer treatment options to make the road to recovery a little smoother....


Fact or Fiction

by Scientific American Editors

Did NASA really spend millions creating a pen that would write in space? Is chocolate poisonous to dogs? Does stress cause gray hair? These questions are just a sample of the urban lore investigated in this...


The Changing Face of War

by Scientific American Editors

Advances in technology often concur with times of war—the nuclear bomb is perhaps the most iconic example. The then-new knowledge of nuclear physics and the fear that the Nazis might develop a weapon pushed...


Becoming Human

by Scientific American Editors

We humans are a strange bunch. We have self-awareness and yet often act on impulses that remain hidden. We were forged in adversity but live in a world of plenty. How did we get here? What is to become of us?...


Can We Feed the World?

by Scientific American Editors

With global population numbers projected to increase by 2 billion by 2050, a veritable food crisis is on the horizon. In this eBook, Can We Feed the World? The Future of Food, we examine some of the complex...


Possibilities in Parallel

by Scientific American Editors

Parallel universes are a staple of science fiction, and it's no wonder. They allow us to explore the question, "what if?" in a way that lets us step completely outside of the world we know, rather than question...


Eat, Move, Think

by Scientific American Editors

While many of us strive to live healthy lives, the task can be daunting and the information overwhelming. Should we be more concerned with our diet or with keeping our weight down? How important is exercise?...


Remember When?

by Scientific American Editors

We don’t often marvel at the process of remembering—that is, until we forget. What allows us to remember, and how do we forget? Most importantly, why do we remember certain things and not others? In this...