The History Press

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The Sinking of the Titanic

by Logan Marshall

When she set sail from Southampton on her maiden voyage to New York on 10 April 1912, RMS Titanic, the pride of the White Star fleet, was the largest ocean liner in the world. Deemed 'practically unsinkable'...


The Last Days of Richard III and the fate of his DNA

by John Ashdown-Hill

The Last Days of Richard III contains a new and uniquely detailed exploration of Richard's last 150 days. By deliberately avoiding the hindsight knowledge that he will lose the Battle of Bosworth Field, we discover...


Sophie Scholl: The Real Story of the Woman who Defied Hitler

by Frank McDonough

On 22 February 1943, Sophie Scholl, a 21-year-old student at Munich University, was executed by the Nazi regime, along with two fellow students from the White Rose resistance movement. They had fought against...


Our Man in Malaya: John Davis, CBE, DSO, Force 136 SOE and Postwar Counter-insurgency

by Margaret Sheenan

When the Japanese invaded Malaya during the Second World War, it seemed that John Davis' service in the country had come to an end. But nothing could have been further from the truth. Davis switched from the...


Oyster: A World History

by Drew Smith

Oysters are older than us, older than grass. They have been present at every turn of human history. They have inspired great writers, painters, cooks, sustained whole communities and fashioned legend and history....


The Last Roman: Romulus Augustulus and the Decline of the West

by Adrian Murdoch

A story of an empire breathing its last, this work is a biography about Romulus Augustulus. It focuses on the personalities behind this story and reveals the world into which Romulus was born - an empire that...


Music and Men: The Life and Loves of Harriet Cohen

by Helen Fry

It was during the turbulent decade of the First World War that the intensely gifted and beautiful Harriet Cohen established herself as a pianist. Enjoying huge success in her professional life, she was the first...


The Flight of Rudolf Hess

by Roy Conyers Conyers Nesbit & Georges van van Acker

On 10 May 1941, Rudolf Hess - Deputy Fuhrer of the Third Reich - embarked on his astonishing flight from Augsburg to Scotland. At dusk the same day, he parachuted on to a Scottish moor and was taken into custody....


The Gods of the Celts

by Miranda Green

This is a fascinating book about the Celts and their religion, which covers all aspects of the gods, ritual customers, cult-objects and sacred places of the ancient Celtic peoples. The first chapter introduces...


Out of the Firing Line...Into the Foyer: My Remarkable Story

by Andy Merriman, Bruce Copp & Dame Judi Dench

War hero and '60s Soho doyen Bruce Copp has lived a unique life in which he has formed lifelong friendships with celebrities, swam regularly with a James Bond, hung out with Lenny Bruce and spent an unforgettable...


The Little Book of Warwickshire

by Lynne R Williams

The Little Book of Warwickshire is a compendium of fascinating information about the county, past and present. Contained within is a plethora of entertaining facts about Warwickshire's famous and occasionally...


The Little Book of Bristol

by Maurice Fells

The Little Book of Bristol is an intriguing, fast-paced, fact-packed compendium of places, people and trivia. A rich, and indeed sometimes bizarre, thread of history weaves its way through the 'Bristol story'....


The Little Book of Cardiff

by Gareth Bennett & David Collins

The Little Book of Cardiff is an intriguing, fast-paced, fact-packed compendium of places, people and events in the city, from its earliest origins to the present day. Here you can read about the important contributions...


Love and War in the WRNS: Letters Home 1940-46

by Vicky Unwin

Sheila Mills came from a sheltered middle class upbringing before she joined the WRNS in 1940. The working life of a women's naval officer in the Second World War was a hard one. The discipline and trials of...


Never Mind the Drop Goal: The Ultimate Rugby World Cup Quiz Book

by Phil Ascough

The Rugby World Cup: it's the scrum of the earth, the biggest, the best and the most prestigious rugby union tournament in the world. It also throws up some of sport's most enduring and exciting rivalries, as...


The Armoured Campaign in Normandy June-August 1944

by Stephen Napier

Beginning with the D-Day landings, this is a frank appraisal of the planned use and actual results of the deployment of armour by both German and Allied commanders in the major tank battles of the campaign including...


Heroes of Postman's Park

by John Price

The Watts Memorial to Heroic Self-Sacrifice in Postman's Park, London, is a Victorian monument containing fifty-four ceramic plaques commemorating sixty-two individuals, each of whom lost their own life while...


Young, Brave and Beautiful

by Tania Szabô

SOE agent Violette Szabô was the daughter of an English father and French mother, and widow of a French army officer killed in action in North Africa in 1942. On her second mission she was captured by the Germans,...


The Queen and Mrs Thatcher

by Dean Palmer

This is the remarkable story of how the two most powerful women in Britain met and disliked each other on sight. For over a decade they quietly waged a war against each other on both a personal and political...


The Steam Rail Motors of the Great Western Railway

by Ken Gibbs

Self-propelled carriages were a big innovation at the beginning of the twentieth century and the GWR was quick to develop a large number of steam motor cars to link farms and scattered villages to the new branch...