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In the Kingdom of the Sick: A Social History of Chronic Illness in America

by Laurie Edwards

Thirty years ago, Susan Sontag wrote, "Everyone who is born holds dual citizenship in the kingdom of the well and the kingdom of the sick ... Sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify...


Midlife Eating Disorders: Your Journey to Recovery

by Cynthia M. Bulik, Ph.D.

In most people's minds, "eating disorder" (ED) conjures images of a thin, white, upper-middle-class teenage girl. The ED landscape has changed. Countless men and women in midlife and beyond, from all ethnic...


The International Bank of Bob: Connecting Our Worlds One $25 Kiva Loan at a Time

by Bob Harris

Hired by ForbesTraveler.com to review some of the most luxurious accommodations on Earth, and then inspired by a chance encounter in Dubai with the impoverished workers whose backbreaking jobs create such opulence,...


Everybody Matters: My Life Giving Voice

by Mary Robinson

One of the most inspiring women of our age, Mary Robinson has spent her life in pursuit of a fairer world, becoming a powerful and influential voice for human rights around the globe. Displaying a gift for storytelling...


Last Ape Standing: The Seven-Million-Year Story of How and Why We Survived

by Chip Walter

Over the past 150 years scientists have discovered evidence that at least twenty-seven species of humans evolved on planet Earth. These weren't simply variations on apes, but upright-walking humans who lived...


The Joy of Sexus: Lust, Love, and Longing in the Ancient World

by Vicki León

In her previous books, Vicki León put readers in the sandals of now obsolete laborers, ranging from funeral clowns to armpit pluckers, and untangled the twisted threads of superstition and science in antiquity....


Words from the White House: Words and Phrases Coined or Popularized by America’s Presidents

by Paul Dickson

The founding fathers (a term created by Warren G. Harding for his "front porch campaign" of 1920) felt that coining words and creating new uses for old ones was part of their role in creating a new American...


Spectrums: Our Mind-boggling Universe from Infinitesimal to Infinity

by David Blatner

In Spectrums, David Blatner blends narrative and illustration to illuminate the variety of spectrums that affect our lives every day: numbers, size, light, sound, heat, and time.There is actually surprisingly...


Fusiliers: The Saga of a British Redcoat Regiment in the American Revolution

by Mark Urban

The American Revolution from a unique perspective--as seen through the eyes of a redcoat regiment.

From Lexington Green in 1775 to Yorktown in 1781, one British regiment marched thousands of miles and fought...


Papa Spy: Love, Faith, and Betrayal in Wartime Spain

by Jimmy Burns

In the 1930s Tom Burns was a rising star of British publishing, whose friends and authors included G. K. Chesterton, Evelyn Waugh, Graham Greene, the artist Eric Gill and the poet David Jones. And among his...


The Damnation of John Donellan: A Mysterious Case of Death and Scandal in Georgian England

by Elizabeth Cooke

On August 30, 1780--at the height of the American Revolution--twenty-year-old Theodosius Boughton, the dissolute heir to a vast fortune and the seventh Boughton baronetcy, died suddenly and in painful convulsions...


Mirror Earth: The Search for Our Planet’s Twin

by Michael D Lemonick

In the mid-1990s, astronomers made history when they began to find planets orbiting stars in the Milky Way. More than eight hundred planets have been found since then, yet none of them is anything like Earth...


Leonardo and the Last Supper

Governor General's Award for Non-Fiction 2012

by Ross King

Early in 1495, Leonardo da Vinci began work in Milan on what would become one of history's most influential and beloved works of art--The Last Supper. After a dozen years at the court of Lodovico Sforza, the...


The Wild Duck Chase: Inside the Strange and Wonderful World of the Federal Duck Stamp Contest

by Martin J Smith

The Wild Duck Chase takes readers into the peculiar world of competitive duck painting as it played out during the 2010 Federal Duck Stamp Contest-the only juried art competition run by the U.S. government....


Shadow of the Rock

Spike Sanguinetti #1

by Thomas Mogford

A humid summer night in Gibraltar. Lawyer Spike Sanguinetti finds Solomon Hassan, an old school friend, waiting on his doorstep. Solomon has been accused of murdering a Spanish girl, Esperanza, in Tangiers -...


I Was Born There, I Was Born Here

by Mourid Barghouti

In 1996 Barghouti went back to his Palestinian home for the first time since his exile following the Six-Day War in 1967, first in Egypt and then in Hungary, and wrote a poignant and incisive account of the...


Yankee Come Home: On the Road from San Juan Hill to Guantánamo

by William Craig

Yankee Come Home explores one family's history in Cuba, and through it, the intense, complex, smoldering relationship between the island nation and its leviathan neighbor.

In Cuba's most entrancing, storied landscape,...


Deception: The Untold Story of East-West Espionage Today

by Edward Lucas

From the capture of Sidney Reilly, the 'Ace of Spies', by Lenin's Bolsheviks in 1925, to the deportation from the USA of Anna Chapman, the 'Redhead under the Bed', in 2010, Kremlin and Western spymasters have...


Why Spencer Perceval Had to Die: The Assassination of a British Prime Minister

by Andro Linklater

At approximately 5:15pm on the afternoon of May 11, 1812, Spencer Perceval, the all-powerful Prime Minister of Great Britain, was fatally shot at short range in the lobby of Parliament. His assailant was John...


Experiment Eleven: Dark Secrets Behind the Discovery of a Wonder Drug

by Peter Pringle

In 1943, Albert Schatz, a young Rutgers College Ph.D. student, worked on a wartime project in microbiology professor Selman Waksman's lab, searching for an antibiotic to fight infections on the front lines and...