Paul_Samael Paul_Samael

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Paul Samael lives in the UK. He is the author of a novel ("In the future this will not be necessary") and several short stories, all of which are available free of charge on Feedbooks. He also reviews free fiction by other self-published authors here: http://www.paulsamael.com/free-fiction-review.php


Books Published (5 books)


The King of Infinite Space

by Paul Samael

A short story about a chance meeting with an old schoolfriend on a train. It's also about being alone with your thoughts. Or just about being alone.

The Pick Up

by Paul Samael

Should you ever lay a hand on someone else's child? A short story about bringing up children, media hysteria and building sand castles. "I'm very happy to recommend it to anyone who appreciates a good story,...

In the future this will not be necessary

by Paul Samael

Miles Jensen has a confession to make. To the "true believers", he is the faithful guardian of a website devoted to the late Pete Novotnik, founder of a future-obsessed internet cult. But Miles is not a true...

The Hardest Word

by Paul Samael

Does the banking crisis make you feel angry, frustrated and powerless? Perhaps it’s time you did something about that feeling. You could, for example, kidnap a banker. On second thoughts, don’t do that -...

Agricultural Production in the Sudan

by Paul Samael

A (very) short story about sunflowers, a Sheikh and the desire to change the world. Does not contain any statistics about Sudanese agriculture (sorry). "[A]n entirely adept and subtle short story; this one will...

Bookshelf (31 books)


Comments (8 comments)


Commented on The Pick Up

Paul_Samael
Paul_Samael (5 books)
Sun, 29 Sep 2013 00:16:50 +0200

Thanks Michael - much appreciated !


Commented on Ledman Pickup

Paul_Samael
Paul_Samael (5 books)
Mon, 03 Jun 2013 23:25:46 +0200

In a world of personal devices, how personal is too personal? Zoey Bridges makes her living testing gadgets – but on this occasion, the gadget she’s been sent doesn’t seem to do anything. She sends it back, only to discover (to her horror) that it’s got lost in transit. She and the gizmo’s obsessively secretive designers then try to track it down - but it seems to have developed a mind of its own. Aside from the gadget (and one or two other details), the world of the story is recognisably… (more)