A Cultural Paradox: Fun in Mathematics

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jazfeed
jazfeed (1 book)
Wed, 01 Sep 2010 12:36:47 +0200

Prochroma,

The mathematics is correct. The key is to realize that the second round (after Monty opened Door Two) probability for each of the remaining two doors should not be treated equally. This is what makes it such a counter intuitive problem. The typical response is that there is a mistake and insist that the doors have equal weight. For a more detailed explanation please refer to http://mathforum.org/dr/math/faq/faq.monty.hall.html.

Cheers,
Jeff


prochroma
prochroma
Wed, 01 Sep 2010 07:07:59 +0200

Jeffrey, I got to the end of 'pick a winner' fearing that the storytelling won over the discipline. After the door was opened you were prepared to reassign probability to door 3, but not to door 2. Both doors should have been treated equally. First round probability for each of three doors is 1/3. Second round probability for each of two doors is 1/2. To choose to switch vs not to switch, is a new choice, independent of the first round. Opening one more door would naturally produce certainty… (more)


kristulele21
kristulele21
Tue, 10 Aug 2010 18:43:44 +0200

As a post-college member of society I've been on a mission to expand my horizons, more specifically a quest of giving second chances (particularly to things that once made me curse the heavens) thus my reading a book about math. A friend of mine suggested it and I can honestly say that no bias in the world could have made me like math...nope, either math won me over or my heart would remain stone. (I went to an arts college that did not require math classes...one of the reasons I picked it.)… (more)


jazfeed
jazfeed (1 book)
Fri, 16 Jul 2010 02:34:57 +0200

I appreciate getting your feedback, especially if you enjoyed something but more importantly I hope you enjoy the math! - Jeff